PART I. PRINT MEDIA

C.A. Mогилевцев

АНГЛОЯЗЫЧНЫЕ МЕДИЙНЫЕ ТЕКСТЫ: УЧИМСЯ ПОНИМАТЬ, АНАЛИЗИРОВАТЬ, ИНТЕРПРЕТИРОВАТЬ

LEARNING TO UNDERSTAND, ANALYSE AND INTERPRET

ENGLISH MASS MEDIA TEXTS

Пособие для студентов учреждений, обеспечивающих получение высшего образования по специальности «Современные иностранные языки (перевод)»

2-е издание, исправленное и дополненное

Trial Version

Minsk 2016

УДК 811.111’25 (0758)

ББК 81.432.1 – 77

М74

Р е к о м е н д о в а н о Редакционным советом Минского государственного лингвистического университета. Протокол № от г.

Р е ц е н з е н т ы :

Могилевцев, С.А.

М74 Англоязычные медийные тексты: Учимся понимать, анализировать, интерпретировать = Learning to Understand, Analyse and Interpret English Mass Media Texts: пособие для сту­дентов учреждений, обеспечивающих получение высшего образования по PART I. PRINT MEDIA специальности «Современные иностранные языки (пере­вод)» / С.А. Могилевцев. – 2-е изд., испр. и доп. – Минск : МГЛУ, 2016. – 160 с.

ISBN .

В пособии рассматриваются лингвистические особенности английских новостных медиатекстов. Комплекс упражнений пособия направлен на формирование навыков аудирования телевизионных и радийных новостных текстов, содержательного анализа содержащейся в них информа­ции, способов ее лингвистического выражения. Пособие имеет лингвострано­ведческую направленность, что позволяет расширить и систематизировать знания, по­лученные студентами при изучении курса страноведения Великобритании и США.

Предназначено для студентов 3 курса английского отделения переводческого фа­культета МГЛУ. Может быть использовано студентами других факультетов и вузов, изучающими английский язык на продвинутом этапе.

УДК PART I. PRINT MEDIA 811.111’25

ББК 81.432.1–77

ISBN 978-985-460-456-5©Могилевцев С.А., 2016

© УО «Минский государственный лингвистический

университет»,12016

Contents

Preface ……………………..….…………..……………...……………
Part I. Print Media ………………………….……………...…………
Unit 1. Print Media: General Notion ………….…………………..……..…
Unit 2.Newspaper Headlines and Their Linguistic Peculiarities ….............
Unit 3. NewspaperArticles: Lexical Features …………………………….
Unit 4. Newspaper Articles: Grammar and Syntax .......................................
Unit 5. Feature Articles: Essence, Structure, Linguistic Properties………..
Unit 6.Editorial, Op-ed, Column, LTE: General Overview ………….……
Test 1. Print Media …………………………………..………………………
Part II. Broadcast News Media ….………………….….…….………
Unit 7.Broadcast News Media: General Notion .………………………….
Unit 8. Major Genres of Broadcast News Media ........................................
Unit 9. Broadcast News Media Discourse: General Overview ….…………
Unit 10. Broadcast News Media Discourse: Lexical Features …….….……
Unit 11. Broadcast News Media Discourse: Stylistics and Syntax …….….
Test 2………………………………………………………………………..
Unit 12. Broadcast News Media Discourse: Grammar PART I. PRINT MEDIA …………….. …….
Unit 13.Learning to Work with Broadcast News Media Texts……………
Test 3……………………………………………………………………..
Unit 14. Regional Accents of British Broadcast News Outlets……………. Unit 15. Broadcast News Media Discourse: Revision ………….…………. Final Test ………………………………………………………………….. References …..……….……………………………………….…..……

Preface

LEARNING TO UNDERSTAND, ANALYSE AND INTERPRET ENGLISH MASS MEDIA TEXTS aims to help advanced English learning students to understand English news print and broadcast texts.



The book underpins the course “Mass Media Discourse” studied by third-year students of the School of Translation and Interpreting at Minsk State Linguistic University. The aim of the course is to develop communicative competence of students in understanding and interpreting English news media discourse PART I. PRINT MEDIA, making a special focus on its linguistic and sociocultural component.

The book consists of two parts, dealing with English print media texts (Part I, seven units) and British broadcast media texts (Part II, eight units). Each unit outlines linguistic features of a particular news media text and is backed up by a hefty practical part, aimed at determining mediatext genres, studying their morphological and syntactical features, making transripts of broadcast mediatexts, translating some texts or their fragments into Russian. Special attention is paid to newspaper headlines as they embrace all linguistic features of English media discourse. Regional varieties of British English are PART I. PRINT MEDIA also highlighted in the book.

The book can be used in class or as a self-study, and could be recommendd to students of other language schools and universities.

First edition of the book was published in 2011 under the title ‘Learning to understand and interpret mass media texts’. Second edition, thoroughly revised (concept, theory, terminology, tasks) and upgraded, mirrors the latest changes in the political and economic life of Great Britain. The book also lists some aspects of socio-political and economic life in the USA and Ireland.

PART I. PRINT MEDIA

Unit 1

PRINT MEDIA: GENERAL NOTION

Communication can be regarded PART I. PRINT MEDIA on two levels:

- personal communication (sharing information by speaking, writing, or other methods);

- sending messages to a large audience. That type of communication is called m a s s c o m m u n i c a t i o n. Books are one of the oldest methods of mass communication, and television being one of the newest. Newspapers and radio texts are other ways to spread information to the wide public. Mass media, thereby, denotes a section of the media specifically designed to reach a large audience. The term mass media was coined in the 1920s with PART I. PRINT MEDIA the advent of nationwide radio networks, mass-circulation newspapers and magazines.

Mass media exists in the followingf o r m s:

- print media (newspapers, magazines and journals);

- broadcast media (radio and television);

- electronic media (electronic papers and other publications posted in the Internet).

The f u n c t i o n sof mass media are:

- to inform a wide audience about the current events,

- to suggest and often to impose their possible interpretation of the event,

- to share an opinionabout them with a contemporary.

Mass media, subsequently, plays a crucial role in forming and reflecting public opinion, connecting PART I. PRINT MEDIA the world to individuals and reproducing the self-image of a society.

A newspaper is a publication devoted chiefly to pre­senting and commenting on the news. Newspapers have certain advantages over the other major news outlets – television, radio, and news maga­zines. Newspapers, for example, can cover more news and in much greater detail than television and radio news bulletins.

There are two major newspaper formats – standard and tabloid.

A standard-sized newspaper has pages that measure about 60 cm by 38 cm. It is also called a b r o a d s h e e t (also PART I. PRINT MEDIA known as a qualitypaper or a heavy). The major United Kingdom quality papers are The Times, The Sunday Times, The Daily Telegraph, The Sunday Telegraph, The Guardian, The Observer, The Independent, The Financial Times (or the FT).

The main US quality papers are The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and The USA Today.

The Globe and Mail, The National Post are the major Canadian broadsheets.

The pages of a t a b l o i d are about half the size of a quality paper. The United Kingdom most popular tabloids are The Sun, The Sun on PART I. PRINT MEDIA Sunday, The Daily Mirror, The Daily Express, The Daily Mail, The Sunday Express, The Sunday Mirror. The US tabloids list The National Enquirer, The Star Magazine, The New York Post. In Britain tabloids are known as popular papers (or pops).

There is also a Berlineror a midi format newspaper, listing such European papers, as Le Monde (France), La Stampa (Italy), El Pais (Spain). Since 2005 it has been The Guardian in the United Kingdom.

The tabloid format is currently used in pub­lishing some quality British papers, e.g. The Times, The Independent, The I (launched in autumn 2010 by The PART I. PRINT MEDIA Indepenent), The London Evening Standard.

Newspapers are further classed into:

- daily newspapers (the bulk of the listed above),

- weekly newspapers (the Observer),

- special-interest newspapers (they feature news of concern to particular groups, like The FT, The Money Market UK).

Newspapers may also be national or international (The International Herald Tribune), focusing chiefly on international developments.

Every newspaper is made up of three huge sections, featuring the three major spheres of public relations – politics (home and foreign developments), business (economy, finance, banking, insurance), sport.

Newspaper style may be defined as a system of interrelated lexical, grammatical and PART I. PRINT MEDIA stylistic means which is perceived by the reader of a particular language community as a separate unity that serves the purposes of informing and instructing.


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